Modern Artwork with Digital Canvases

People / Products / June 12, 2013

Ever the entrepreneur, David Diskin saw a vacuum in the design world, and filled it.

With affordable, modern art.

“I come from a design background – in clothing, furniture and home design,” he says.  “I wanted to create a design collection for historical, modern art.”

And he did.  When you walk into his showroom in Bridgehampton, you’ll find 250 different works of art, printed on canvas and inspired by movements, styles or trends of the past century.  His collections are edited down for a limited selection.  The emphasis is on quality and affordability.

“It’s nice, modern and contemporary art but at a price point that makes it available to all,” he says.

Indeed.  A five-foot by three-and-a-half-foot canvas sports a price tag of $389, with free shipping.  It’s printed with oil-based paint, so it’s waterproof and will not fade. The same image is available in small and medium sizes as well.

“My team is always thinking about how to democratize the art experience,” he says.  “We’re a direct marketer – there’s no middleman.”

The artwork at Modern Digital Canvas is all original, though certainly inspired by trends familiar to most decorators.

“If I were painting I’d be a minimalist – I’m very influenced by Rothko,” he says.

So what you’ll see in his showroom will be versions of certain styles, rather than copies.  It might be Hollywood Regency or Mid-Century Modern.  What’s most interesting to him is the style that looks best for interior decorating.

His newest foray, called the Paris Apartment collection, is eclectic and influenced by Gertrude Stein’s apartment and art, as well as by Coco Chanel, Karl Lagerfeld, and Philippe Starck.  Some of the 32 designs explore Cubist and Impressionist themes, while others were inspired by the Musée D’orsay and the Mediterranean coast.

But they’re all bold – and they’re all affordable.

For more information, go to http://www.md-canvas.com/

View Images:


Tags: ,



Michael Welton
I write about architecture, art, and design for national and international publications. I am the author of "Drawing from Practice: Architects and the Meaning of Freehand" (Routledge, 2015), and the former architecture critic for the News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C.




Previous Post

Super-Insulated and Passive Homes

Next Post

Debating Architecture, Art and Nature





You might also like



0 Comment


Leave a Reply


More Story

Super-Insulated and Passive Homes

Once you've built a super-insulated, passive house, says architectural designer Julie Torres Moskovitz, it’s hard to go back. “Whatever...

June 11, 2013