An Online Test Drive for the Bath

General / People / Products / June 25, 2012

If you’re not going to be selling your home anytime soon, you might as well go online and redesign your bathroom.

“That’s the thinking behind the Axor Bouroullec collection, from Hansgrohe’s designer brand, Axor. ”

“It’s up to the end user on how to interpret, use and install it,” says Kiel Wuellner, Axor’s studio manager and interior designer.  “It’s by far one of the most innovative lines in the industry.

Indeed.  When their new line debuted at the ICFF in May, French designers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec walked away with the “Best in Kitchen and Bath” award.  Since then, it’s been featured at Modern Atlanta a few weeks back, and at Dwell on Design this past weekend.

But it’s the online tool at the Axor website that brings it all home.  The tool allows visitors to customize a sink by dragging different accessories to it.

The line offers eight different sinks, pre-drilled or without holes, so that the end user can make decisions about where spouts or handles will go.  “They’re cast resin, and can be completely customized to the client’s likings or the space,” he says.  “The line encourages limitless creativity.”

Made up of faucets, washbasins, a bathtub, shower components, and accessories, Axor Bouroullec invites users to think about how they use the space and interact with water to create their own customized bathroom configurations.

“The sinks can offer one shelf or two, so you’re encouraged to leave toiletries on display, from tooth paste to soaps, for the design effect instead of just utility,” he says.

Sinks can be wall-mounted or set on tables with wooden tops, their levers mounted at the front to make them ADA accessible.  Hot water knobs can be mounted further back from the front, to make hot-water burns for children less likely.

Most impressive is its low-key look.  “It’s very relaxing,” Wuellner says.  “It’s a very quiet collection.”

To take it for a test drive, go to http://www.hansgrohe-usa.com/7080.htm

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Michael Welton
I write about architecture, art, and design for national and international publications. I am the author of "Drawing from Practice: Architects and the Meaning of Freehand" (Routledge, 2015), and the former architecture critic for the News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C.




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