Wine Bars for the Space-Challenged

People / Products / October 7, 2016

We’ve been writing about Resource Furniture’s remarkably versatile and multi-functional furniture for years now. Their collections are perfect for the space-challenged urban dweller. Now they’ve introduced three new uber-chic sideboards that double as wine bars – and we’ve interviewed design director Challie Stillman about them via email:

Who designed these three?
Like most of the products in the Resource Furniture collection, these pieces are designed in Europe. Mister and Pisces are made in Portugal, Giralot is made in Italy.

Who’s the target market?
Anyone looking for a stylish piece that also serves a purpose to add to their home.

Materials?
Mister: Oak and Walnut
Pisces: oak or walnut and lacquer
Giralot: Oak or Walnut and lacquer

Inspiration/precedents for their design?
We have chosen to add these three products to our collection because of the high quality materials and innovative design. They each uniquely round out our collection of
multifunctional furniture.

Functionality?
Pisces is a compact bar that closes up store bottles and accessories. The Mister sideboard features adjustable interiors, including five removable drawers and seven removable shelves. This allows the piece to function as a sideboard, desk or bar.
Giralot features storage units crafted of walnut or oak that swivel180 degrees on a column that rests on the floor and is attached to the wall.

Availability?
Available to order through Resource Furniture.

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Michael Welton
I write about architecture, art, and design for national and international publications. I am the author of "Drawing from Practice: Architects and the Meaning of Freehand" (Routledge, 2015), and the former architecture critic for the News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C.




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1 Comment

on October 8, 2016

We inherited a Bauhaus wine/liquor bar which attaches to the wall and has a drop-leaf front. It has bookshelves below so it’s heavier looking (and heavier in reality) than this design but very functional.



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