New Ravenna Adds to Its Studio Line, Ships in Two Days

General / People / Places / Products / December 3, 2021

A snarled supply chain?

Piffle!

Not at New Ravenna Mosaics.

Just in time for the holiday season, the Virginia-based studio has made five additions to Studio Line of handmade mosaics.

“Each fall we like to add a few more,” say Cean Irminger, creative director at New Ravenna. “Now there are 77 mosaics – in simple patterns that are not as intense as our couture lines.”

They’re available, pronto, for two-day shipping from New Ravenna’s design center in Exmore on the Eastern Shore. Plus, they’re in the studio’s low-to-medium price range, which makes them all the more appealing.

“They’re made in our studio in Virginia, in the same color lot and material as all of our mosaics,” she says. “They’re marketed, manufactured, and shipped all in the same place, with the same standards as our custom products.”

The new mosaics have been created in calm, muted tones and are called Euclid Grand, Wickerweave, Bonaparte, Esmeralda and Staggered 2 cm Celeste. Entirely hand crafted, the designs are created with natural stone that has been tumbled, polished, and honed.

“We’ve added a few colors like a light blue stone, plus warm creams, and whites,” she says. “They’re gentle, seasonal tones – with the world where it is today, they’re soft and soothing with patterns and tones for a comforting vibe.”

There are basket weaves, grids, and a classic, dimensional, three-sided tumbled block. “These patterns are just classics that will look great as a centerpiece or background to decorative elements,” she says. “They’ll stand the test of time in patterns and palette.”

They’re mostly for floors, and in a medium-to-small scale. “They can go on a back splash or powder room floors,” she says. “They can be used wherever someone wants to have a stone surface – it’s a good, usable scale.”

Besides, while the rest of the world cools its jets and waits for deliveries, these mosaics will be on your doorstep in two days.

For more, go here.


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Michael Welton
I write about architecture, art, and design for national and international publications. I am the author of "Drawing from Practice: Architects and the Meaning of Freehand" (Routledge, 2015), and the former architecture critic for the News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C.




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