‘Elemental,’ by Fiona Barratt-Campbell

General / People / Products / December 11, 2019

Fiona Barratt-Campbell studied interior design at Chelsea College of Art in London and Parsons School of Design in New York, and founded Studio Fiona Barratt Interiors14 years ago. The studio works on both high-end residential and hospitality projects in the U.K. and around the world. She has a new book out from Rizzoli called “Elemental,” and A+A recently interviewed her by email:

Can you please define elemental?
Elemental was the perfect title for my book, as the word embodies the power of nature by definition and my work is very much inspired by nature in all its forms – from the shapes, the textures and the constant evolution.

Your design philosophy?
It is to produce interiors that enhance not dictate the way you live through well thought-out spaces that possess true design integrity and an eclectic mixture of textures both natural and man-made.

Your approach to materiality?
I have a very unique approach to materiality. I like to mix manmade with natural materials. Materials that are heavily textured with smooth ones. The objective is to create a feast for the senses. I want people to interact with the spaces.

Your design inspiration?
The natural world is a huge inspiration for me, and the constant process of evolution that nature goes through means there is always inspiration and, of course, travel. It is so important for your personal development of taste to experiences differing countries and cultures. In my furniture I am inspired by Roman artifacts and architecture. I am in awe of how advanced they were as a people.

Why a book?
It felt like the right time to do a book. I had accumulated a diverse body of work and wanted to share it on a larger scale.

The projects in it – why were they chosen?
The projects I chose for the book are all in their own way individual from many aspects; location, type of building, client remit and style.

For more, go here.

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