Bella Notte’s Bria: New Elements for the Sleep Sanctuary

General / People / Products / January 13, 2022

A different way of weaving gives Bria, Bella Notte’s newest line of cotton sheets and pillowcases, a silky-soft feel.

“It’s cotton sateen, created in the way that fibers are woven,” says Heather Asker, Bella Notte’s Merchandising and Marketing Manager. “Usually fibers are woven in a one-thread, over-under pattern, but Sateen is woven so each thread passes perpendicularly over three threads and under one.”

The process yields more surface area and a softer finish. “It’s a shinier finish that’s silky,” she says. “The underside is a little more matte and you can see the way it’s woven, and that helps with knowing which side is up.”

Five years ago, the now-25-year-old firm added a direct-to-consumer business to its existing B2B outreach. That initiative’s paid off in spades, it turns out.

“We started as B2B, going to markets and shows, and then more boutiques throughout the country, and to Canada and other countries,” she says. “We’d never had that direct link before – and now they can talk directly with us, with questions and comments.”

They’ve discovered a consumer asking for cotton finishes in addition to linen. Fulfilling that request gives another texture and dimension to the bedroom – so the firm’s getting back to basics while emphasizing luxury.

“They’re an understated and underappreciated elements of the sleep sanctuary,” she says. “It adds that feeling of cozy-comfort and elegance, so if you’re working from home, you can be slipping into a sophisticated, luxurious balance in bed.”

As the firm works directly with consumers, they’re also adding a male persona to its fan base. “We’re seeing an emerging male buyer,” she says. “Everybody needs sheets, and you can make your own personal ensemble.”

The Bella Notte collections are habit-forming, it seems – if not downright addictive. “Some people have grown up with Bella Notte over the years and after they’ve slept on them, they don’t want to sleep on anything else,” she says. “Some take their pillowcases everywhere with them – they travel with their Bella Notte linens.”

The Bria collection is offered in Bella Notte’s full 18 colors. “They’re dyed beautifully and richly,” she says. “Even the white is just as beautiful as midnight and jade tones.”

As for cost, the price for a pair of Bria pillowcase runs about $200.

And people don’t blink at a number like that?

“No, not at all,” she says. “If they’re found to be too pricey, we do offer a pay-over-time payment method available at checkout..”

Now that’s an indicator of a keen understanding of the target market.

For more, go here.

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Michael Welton
I write about architecture, art, and design for national and international publications. I am the author of "Drawing from Practice: Architects and the Meaning of Freehand" (Routledge, 2015), and the former architecture critic for the News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C.




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